Low Price Guarantee
We Take School POs
All of our bargain books are brand new, perfectly readable and represent a tremendous value! The bargain books are, however, publisher overstocks and remainders that TRW purchases at deep discounts. As a result, they may have a small mark through the UPC bar code or a small mark on the side of the book. This is simply to mark the books so they cannot be sent back to a publisher. Because of this, bargain books are non returnable to TRW unless they are damaged. Please consider this before ordering.
PLEASE NOTE:
Bargain Books are not eligible for Library Processing
Alma and How She Got Her Name
ISBN: 9780763693558
Author: Martinez-neal, Juana
Publisher: Candlewick Pr
Published: April 2018
Retail: $15.99    OUR PRICE: $10.23
     You Save 36%
Binding Type: Hardcover
Qty:
Annotation: When Alma Sofia Esperanza Josâe Pura Candela asks her father why she has so many names, she hears the story of her name and learns about her grandparents.
Additional Information
BISAC Categories:
- Juvenile Fiction | Family | Multigenerational
- Juvenile Fiction | People & Places | Caribbean & Latin America
- Juvenile Fiction | Social Issues | Self-esteem & Self-reliance
Library of Congress Subjects:
Families; Fiction.
Names, Personal; Fiction.
Dewey: [E]
LCCN: bl2018052455
Academic/Grade Level: Kindergarten, Ages 5-6
Series: Americas Award for Children's and Young Adult Literature. Commended
Book type: Easy Fiction
Target Grade: Preschool
Grade level: Preschool
Physical Information: 0.25" H x 25.00" L x 9.00" W
Bargain Category: Early Elementary, Growing Up, Picture Books
Grade level(s): PreK, Kindergarten, 1st, 2nd, 3rd
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Contributor Bio(s): Juana Martinez-Neal is the daughter and granddaughter of painters. She started her story in Lima, Peru, and then moved to the United States. The winner of a 2018 Pura Belpré Illustrator Award for La Princesa and the Pea by Susan Middleton Elya, Juana Martinez-Neal is still writing the story of her life, with the help of her husband and three children, in Arizona.



Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2018 Fall)
Alma Sofia Esperanza Josi Pura Candela feels self-conscious about her long name until her father tells her about the family members after whom she is named. The pictures--grayscale print-transfer illustrations with soft textures--steal the show in their depiction of the sweet closeness between Alma and her father as well as her connection to her ancestors. Also available in Spanish. Copyright 2018 Horn Book Guide Reviews.
Reviewed by Horn Book Magazine Reviews (Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2018 #3)
Alma Sofia Esperanza José Pura Candela feels self-conscious about her long name until her father tells her about the family members after whom she is named. Use of the past tense indicates that her grandparents, a great-aunt, and a great-grandparent are deceased, but they are very much alive in Alma, who delightedly proclaims the ways in which she is like them as her father recounts their accomplishments and attributes. Straightforward text describes one ancestor who was especially spiritual and another who was an activist, one who loved books and flowers, and another who longed to travel. Throughout, grayscale print transfer illustrations have a soft visual texture, and subtle colored-pencil highlights in pinks and blues enliven each spread. The pictures end up stealing the show in their depiction of the sweet closeness between Alma and her father. They also convey a subtle, supernatural connection between Alma and her ancestors, whose images in the family photos make eye contact with her outside of her father's awareness. Details in the illustrations also point toward specificity of the family's Peruvian heritage. An author's note reveals the story of Martinez-Neal's own full name, asking readers, "What is the story of your name? What story would you like to tell?" Concurrently published in Spanish as Alma y cómo obtuvo su nombre. megan dowd lambert Copyright 2018 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.
Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2018 January #5)

Her full name is Alma Sofia Esperanza José Pura Candela, and it's so long that "it never fits," as the girl explains to her father. (When she writes it on a sheet of paper, she has to tape an extra piece to the bottom.) But as Daddy explains that there's a remarkable relative behind each of her names, Alma realizes that she embodies their talents and character, and she comfortably communes with the spirits of the departed. She loves to draw like her paternal grandfather, José, and she's so inspired by her activist maternal grandmother, Candela, that she strikes the classic Norma Rae pose and declares "I am Candela!" surrounded by her stuffed animals. Best of all, Daddy concludes, she is "the first and only Alma. You will make your own story." Martinez-Neal's first outing as author is a winner—her velvety and largely monochromatic pencil drawings, punctuated with cherry red, teem with emotional intimacy. It's an origin story that envelops readers like a hug. Ages 4–8. Agent: Stefanie Von Borstel, Full Circle Literary. (Apr.)

Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.
Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2018 March)

PreS-Gr 2—It's said there's a story behind every name and Alma Sofia Esperanza José Pura Candela is surely a moniker worthy of six tales. After complaining that her name is so long that it "never fits," Alma's father shares stories with the girl about the people she's been named after, including a book lover, an artist, and a deeply spiritual woman, among others. Martinez-Neal, the recipient of the 2018 Pura Belpré Illustrator Award for La Princesa and the Pea , works in print transfers with graphite and colored pencils for these images, limiting her palette to black, charcoal gray, and blushes of color. The round, stylized figure of the girl, dressed in pink striped pants and a white shirt, pops against the sepia pages (reminiscent of old, family photo albums). As Alma's namesakes emerge from the shadows when they are introduced, they and their distinguishing items (books, plants, paintbrushes, etc.) are highlighted in a pale, gray-blue. The softly colored images and curvilinear shapes that embrace the figures evoke a sense of warmth and affection. At the story's end, the only tale readers have not heard is Alma's. "You will make your own story," states her father. VERDICT A beautifully illustrated, tender story to be shared with all children, sure to evoke conversations about their names.—Daryl Grabarek, School Library Journal

Copyright 2018 School Library Journal.