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Blue Lipstick
ISBN: 9780618851324
Author: Grandits, John
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Published: May 2007
Retail: $7.99    OUR PRICE: $1.99
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Binding Type: Paperback
Qty:
Annotation: In this irreverent companion to "Technically, It's Not My Fault," a 15-year-old girl named Jessie voices typical teenage concerns through poems that are inventive, irresistible, and full of surprises--just like Jessie--and the playful layout and ingenious graphics extend the wry humor. Illustrations.
Additional Information
BISAC Categories:
- Juvenile Nonfiction | Poetry - Humorous
Dewey: 811.6
LCCN: 2006023332
BISAC category: JUVENILE NONFICTION / Poetry / Humorous
Target Grade/Age Group: Grade 7-9, Age 12-14
Grade level: Grade 7-9
Physical Information: 9.00" H x 6.50" L x 0.25" W
Bargain Category: Art/Music, High School, Middle School, Poetry
Grade level(s): 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th
Accelerated Reader Info
Quiz #: 120058
Reading Level: 3.5   Interest Level: Upper Grades   Point Value: 1.0
Scholastic Reading Counts Info
Quiz #: Q46155
Reading Level: 7.3   Interest Level: Grades 9-12   Point Value: 4.0
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.
Publisher Description:
A 15-year-old girl named Jessie voices typical--and not so typical--teenage concerns in this unique, hilarious collection of poems. Her musings about trying out new makeup and hairstyles, playing volleyball and cello, and dealing with her annoying younger brother are never boring or predictable. Who else do you know who designs her own clothes and writes poetry to her cat? Jessie's a girl with strong opinions, and she isn't shy about sharing them. Her funny, sarcastic take on high school life is revealed through concrete poetry: words, ideas, type, and design that combine to make pictures and patterns. The poems are inventive, irreverent, irresistible, and full of surprises--just like Jessie--and the playful layout and ingenious graphics extend the wry humor.

Contributor Bio(s): Grandits, John: - John Grandits is a book and magazine designer and the author of Technically, It's Not My Fault and Blue Lipstick, award-winning books of concrete poetry, and the picture books Ten Rules You Absolutely Must Not Break If You Want to Survive the School Bus, which received the Texas Bluebonnet Award, and Seven Rules You Absolutely Must Follow If You Want to Survive the Cafeteria. He and his wife, Joanne, live in Red Bank, New Jersey. Visit him online at johngrandits.com.
Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2007 Fall)
Grandits playfully channels a teenage girl's dreams, anxieties, and pet peeves in these concrete poems. Across the thirty or so poems, Jessie reveals she's a vegetarian, plays volleyball and cello, and can't stand cheerleaders. In turn feisty and insecure, Jesse leaps off the page. By book's end, she's removed some bricks from "The Wall" that divides her likes and dislikes. Copyright 2007 Horn Book Guide Reviews.
Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2008 Spring)
Grandits playfully channels a teenage girl's dreams, anxieties, and pet peeves in these concrete poems. Across the thirty or so poems, Jessie reveals she's a vegetarian, plays volleyball and cello, and can't stand cheerleaders. In turn feisty and insecure, Jesse leaps off the page. By book's end, she's removed some bricks from "The Wall" that divides her likes and dislikes. Copyright 2008 Horn Book Guide Reviews.
Reviewed by Horn Book Magazine Reviews (Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2007 #4)
Grandits playfully, and quite effectively, channels a teenage girl's dreams, anxieties, and pet peeves -- all in a series of concrete poems, no less -- in this much stronger follow-up to Technically, It's Not My Fault. We first meet ninth-grader Jessie on the book's cover, as she's busy defending her lipstick purchase: "I saw Blue, and it was love at first sight!" Her words (i.e., the poem) form the frame for a mirror that's been kissed by electric-blue lips. It's a cover that'll grab adolescent girls' attention -- and the poetry inside is equally appealing. Grandits works with many different fonts, positioning text in clever ways. In "Bad Hair Day" lines of text push upward and curl around like unruly strands. Sentences spike up and down in "A Chart of My Emotional Day," as Jessie goes from feeling "Just OK" to "Ticked Off" to "Ridiculously Happy." Across the thirty or so poems, Jessie reveals she's a vegetarian, plays volleyball and the cello, and can't stand cheerleaders. But it's to Grandits's credit that his protagonist isn't confined to a 2-D existence. She leaps right off the page, in turn feisty and insecure. And by book's end, she's able to remove a few bricks from "The Wall" that divides her likes from her dislikes -- discovering, among other things, that not all cheerleaders are airheads. Copyright 2007 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.
Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2007 July)

Gr 5–9— Grandits crafts his collections with the needs of poetry-phobic readers in mind. It isn't even necessary to crack the book, since the first poem, "Blue Lipstick," is cleverly placed on the front cover, surrounding a reflective mirror. This selection introduces readers to Jessie, who impulsively purchases blue lipstick, but later, regretfully decides to give it "the kiss-off." Jessie is big sister to Robert, who was featured in Grandits's Technically, It's Not My Fault (Clarion, 2004). As he did in that terrific collection, the author uses artful arrangements of text on the page, along with 54 different typefaces, to bring his images and ideas to life. Jessie's a typical ninth grader who spends much of her time squabbling with her brother; doesn't always see eye-to-eye with her parents; and is preoccupied with clothes, makeup, and dealing with bad-hair days. She confides early on that life is simpler when you build a wall around yourself, as "You've got to be careful who you make friends with." Jessie writes poems to her cat, believes in guardian angels, and though she's quick to form strong opinions, she's smart enough to revise them, too. In the end, she's still got her wall, but she realizes "now I've got more company." This irreverent, witty collection should resonate with a wide audience.—Marilyn Taniguchi, Beverly Hills Public Library, CA

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