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Citizen: An American Lyric
Contributor(s): Rankine, Claudia

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ISBN: 1555976905     ISBN-13: 9781555976903
Publisher: Graywolf Pr
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Binding Type: Paperback - See All Available Formats & Editions
Published: October 2014
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Annotation: "Claudia Rankine's bold new book recounts mounting racial aggressions in ongoing encounters in twenty-first-century daily life and in the media. Some of these encounters are slights, seeming slips of the tongue, and some are intentional offensives in theclassroom, at the supermarket, at home, on the tennis court with Serena Williams and the soccer field with Zinedine Zidane, online, on TV--everywhere, all the time. The accumulative stresses come to bear on a person's ability to speak, perform, and stay alive. Our addressability is tied to the state of our belonging, Rankine argues, as are our assumptions and expectations of citizenship. In essay, image, and poetry, Citizen is a powerful testament to the individual and collective effects of racism in ourcontemporary, often named 'post-race' society"--From publisher's description.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Racism; United States.
BISAC Categories:
- Literary Collections | Essays
- Poetry | American | African American
Dewey: 814/.6
LCCN: 2014935702
Academic/Grade Level: General Adult
Book type: Non-Fiction
Physical Information: 8.00" H x 5.50" W x 0.50" (0.70 lbs) 169 pages
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Contributor Bio(s): Claudia Rankine is the author of four previous books, including Don't Let Me Be Lonely: An American Lyric. She currently is a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets and teaches at Pomona College.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2014 August #3)

In this trenchant new work about racism in the 21st century, Rankine, recently appointed chancellor of the American Academy of Poets and winner of the 2014 Jackson Poetry Prize, extends the innovative formal techniques and painfully clear-sighted vision she established in her landmark Don't Let Me Be Lonely. Accounts of racially charged interactions, insidious and flagrant, transpiring in private and in the public eye, distill the immediate emotional intensity of individual experience with tremendous precision while allowing ambiguity, ambivalence, contradiction, and exhaustion to remain in all their fraught complexity. Combining poetry, essay, and images from media and contemporary art, Rankine's poetics capture the urgency of her subject matter. Indeed, much of the book focuses on language: sound bites from cultural commentators; the words of acquaintances, colleagues, and friends; responses and moments of silence; what it means to address and be addressed; and what it means when one's only recourse is to sigh. "A body translates its you—/ you there, hey you," she writes, "The worst hurt is feeling you don't belong so much/ to you." Once again Rankine inspires sympathy and outrage, but most of all a will to take a deep look at ourselves and our society. (Oct.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2014 PWxyz LLC
 
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