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Cactus Soup
Contributor(s): Kimmel, Eric A. (Author), Huling, Phil (Illustrator)

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ISBN: 0761458328     ISBN-13: 9780761458326
Publisher: Two Lions
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Binding Type: Paperback - See All Available Formats & Editions
Published: April 2011
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Annotation: During the Mexican Revolution, when a troop of hungry soldiers comes to a town where all the food has been hidden, they charm the townspeople into helping make a soup from water and a cactus thorn.
Additional Information
BISAC Categories:
- Juvenile Fiction | People & Places - United States - Hispanic & Latino
Dewey: 398.209
Age Level: 4-8
Grade Level: Preschool-3
Lexile Measure: 580 AD (Adult Directed Text)
Physical Information: 0.13" H x 8.52" W x 10.82" (0.40 lbs) 32 pages
Accelerated Reader Info
Quiz #: 80395
Reading Level: 3.5   Interest Level: Lower Grades   Point Value: 0.5
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2008 Spring)
In this Spanish-language version of his [cf2]Cactus Soup[cf1], Kimmel sets "Stone Soup" in revolutionary Mexico. When a group of soldiers comes to town, the inhabitants hide their food, but the clever captain tricks them into bringing out their snacks and having a party. The Spanish text is read-aloud ready, and the desert-hued watercolor and ink illustrations perfectly communicate mood and setting. Copyright 2008 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2007 Fall)
In this Spanish-language version of his [cf2]Cactus Soup[cf1], Kimmel sets "Stone Soup" in revolutionary Mexico. When a group of soldiers comes to town, the inhabitants hide their food, but the clever captain tricks them into bringing out their snacks and having a party. The Spanish text is read-aloud ready, and the desert-hued watercolor and ink illustrations perfectly communicate mood and setting. Copyright 2007 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2005 Spring)
A fast-moving narrative rich in Spanish vocabulary and generous with opportunities for audience participation deftly sets "Stone Soup" in Mexico during the Revolution. Bright watercolors create a vibrant setting bursting with yellows, oranges, greens, and browns that reflect the countryside and the hot tempo of the final fiesta. Appended with a glossary of Spanish words. Copyright 2005 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Reviewed by Horn Book Magazine Reviews (Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2005 #1)
During the Mexican Revolution, a troop of soldiers rides toward the town of San Miguel; the townspeople decide to hide all their food and discourage the soldiers from staying. El capitan, knowing he must feed his men, requests just one food item: the largest cactus thorn the villagers can find. And so he begins making soup -- although he does yearn for a few additional ingredients. Kimmel, though acknowledging that the tale of "Stone Soup" appears in many cultures, offers no documentation for this Mexican version. Still, the fast-moving narrative is rich in Spanish vocabulary and generous with opportunities for the audience to participate in the telling. Huling's bright watercolors create a vibrant setting bursting with yellows, oranges, greens, and browns that reflect the countryside and the hot tempo of the final fiesta. The curved sombreros, the townspeople's rounded figures, and the circular cooking pot suggest a warm community that complements the soldiers, who are modeled after Picasso's whimsical, lanky Don Quixote. Appended with a glossary of Spanish words. Copyright 2005 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2004 November #2)
Kimmel (The Runaway Tortilla) sets his version of "Stone Soup" during the Mexican Revolution, inspiring some marvelously atmospheric watercolors by Huling (Puss in Cowboy Boots). Hungry soldiers encounter the poverty-feigning townsfolk of San Miguel and announce that they will make enough cactus soup for the troops and the village. And they make it from an unlikely ingredient-a single cactus thorn. By story's end, the soldiers' leader has used reverse psychology to coax genuinely tasty foodstuffs out of the villagers ("Too bad you don't have onions. Cactus soup always tastes better with onions. But why ask for what you don't have?"), and teaches everyone a delicious and festive lesson about sharing and community. Kimmel, ever the master storyteller, incorporates especially vivid cadences in the words of the wily, world-weary captain; but it's Huling who makes the story sing. His comically exaggerated characters garner laughs without shedding their humanity, while his swooping, elongated lines and radiant colors recall the sun-drenched earthiness and high spirits of early 20th-century Mexican art. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2004 October)
Gr 1-4-This Mexican variant of "Stone Soup" calls for a single cactus thorn as its base. The army captain repeatedly teases the poor people of San Miguel with the lament, "Why ask for something you don't have?," seducing the curious folk into adding still more ingredients like chiles, vegetables, and meat to his magical concoction, a yummy comestible that inevitably leads to a fiesta. Huling's elongated watercolor cartoons provide just the right playful, brown-hued visual temperament for the all-round festive deception. The glossary is welcome but, oddly, lacks a pronunciation guide. Even stranger, though, is the postscripted author's note, bizarrely politicizing an otherwise clever cultural retelling (although it gives the artist an opportunity to tack on interesting portraits of Pancho Villa and Emiliano Zapata). Teachers can follow up with Marcia Brown's Stone Soup (Atheneum, 1947), a wonderful example of the international appeal-and ready adaptation-of timeless tales of human nature.-John Sigwald, Unger Memorial Library, Plainview, TX Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
 
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